Framed (paperback)












ISBN Print: 978-1-62830-243-1
Page Count: 204
Word Count: 51289
Rating: Sweet (G-PG)
MSRP: 13.99


When a long-lost painting turns up at Brush & Bevel, a decade-old mystery is reawakened. What really happened to artist Jerry Berger and his model Abby Bingham? Was it a murder-suicide, as the police proclaim, or was it something far more sinister?

Gallery owner Ginny Brent and her loyal staffers, Sue Bradley and Elsie Kimball, each take a different path to unravel the mystery. Together, their discoveries start to form a cohesive whole. But as they get closer to the solution, they discover to their horror that art is not the only thing that can be framed.

Rating: NA
Page Count: 204
Word Count: 51289
978-1-62830-243-1 Paperback
978-1-62830-244-8 Digital

Excerpt:

"Were they lovers?"

Jenna asked, wide-eyed. "You always hear that about artists and their models." Then she blushed.

"Oh, no! Jerry never had any interest in her as a woman."

"But they died," Jenna prompted, absorbed in the story.

Ginny nodded. "Ten years ago last winter. They went missing during a snowstorm. The police went nuts trying to find them. At first, everyone assumed they had just run off together, but it wasn't like that. Mike, her husband, really stirred things up, insisting something had happened. He forced the cops to look into it.

"It took the authorities about three weeks to find them. A hunter came across them in the snow." She looked rather sick. "The coyotes had been at the bodies, but it looked like he killed her and then himself. Mike moved out west and never came back."

She sighed and returned to the present. "All of which means you may have a gold mine on your hands, Jenna. Let us clean it up, verify it is what I think it is. There may even be a signature under all the grease and smoke. Would you feel better if we came up with an agreement about what happens then?"

Sue and Elsie excused themselves and went to the workshop down the stairs from the gallery. "I'd forgotten he killed himself," Sue said.

"Don't you believe it," Elsie replied. "Jerry wouldn't hurt a fly. That was no murder/suicide. It was a double murder."
 




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